Junior Rugby in Sask

After losing out on 2 seasons of summer rugby programs due to COVID-19, Saskatchewan’s junior rugby players have been busy catching up this summer. A number of junior programs and events brought our players back to the pitch, including training with local senior clubs. 

These activities wouldn’t have been possible without the support of community coaches, managers, organisers, and players, and the Sask Rugby High Performance Committee who continue to drive rugby’s progress in the province. Your sport thanks you. 

NORTH VS SOUTH

Organised by a group of women’s coaches, junior girls will be taking the pitch in Saskatoon on August 21 and Regina on August 28 for some North vs South 15s exhibition games. Each day will consist of 2 games with 20 minute halves, and team lunch in between. Good luck ladies!

U18 BOYS CANADA CAMP

Sask Rugby is hosting a U18 Boys Canada camp August 21-22 in Regina for invited athletes. Out of those selected a number of Saskatchewan athletes will have their shot at a tour with the national team in December 2021 to January 2022. Good luck boys!

CANADA SUMMER GAMES TEAM TRAINING

Initially planned for 2021, the  Niagara Canada Summer Games were rescheduled for August of 2022 due to COVID-19. Team Sask started its training with coaches Kayla Mack-Thiel and Gillian Allen in June of 2021. Any U18 girls interested in participating can learn more here: www.saskrugby.com/canadagames

RUGBY ID COMBINE

Organised by the Sask Rugby High Performance Committee, Sask’s first ever Rugby ID Combine took place in July 2021, open to all athletes interested in developing in sport. The all-day session in Regina brought in over 30 athletes and tons of talent.

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

Regina Minor Rugby

Formerly Regina Mini Rugby, Regina Minor has expanded in recent years to include players ages 15 to 18. After getting cancelled in 2020, the program returned in full force August of 2021 and plans to run until October. One of the longest standing community rugby programs in Saskatchewan, RMR is an excellent option for juniors looking to get into the game or develop in a fun environment.

RMR still delivers Minis for its 4-14 ages and the kids love it.

MacDowell Prairie Academy

The Prairie Academy was one of the only training opportunities for juniors during 2020, running sessions whenever possible. The program restarted in May of 2021 and is slated to return for fall sessions in September.  The academy focuses on developing high performance rugby athletes but is open to all ages and skill levels.

NSRU Minor Rugby

Formerly Saskatoon Mini Rugby, the NSRU came together to deliver minor and junior rugby sessions in Saskatoon at the beginning of June 2021. The junior side of the program brought a number of North juniors back to the field and helped in reconnecting them with senior clubs.

Lloydminster Mini Rugby

Lloydminster Mini Rugby

Lloydminster

THE LATEST

Volunteer Coaches Required for All Age Groups 

No experience or rugby knowledge required, training and support will be available 

Don’t be shy! 

Enjoy the game of rugby as a family, or return to the game you once loved.

All registrations must be completed online. If access to credit card is not available please contact us.

FUNDRAISING

In an effort to help fundraise for the Mini Rugby we are asking all Mini members with the involvement of their parent or guardian to help with the collection of unwanted, unused, or unneeded Canadian Tire Money. Mini members are encouraged to collect Canadian Tire Money at home and from family or friends

SMR LLYD FUNdraising.pdf

Contact

E-Mail:  lloydminster.minis@saskrugby.com

Jeff Noble & Cathy Bolton 

If you haven’t yet, join our Facebook group “Saskatchewan Mini Rugby – Lloydminster” for the latest updates, notifications, and photos.

Proudly Supported in Lloydminster by the Lloydminster Reapers Rugby Club, visit them at www.reapersrugby.com

Referees

Why We Officiate

There are many benefits to officiating in Rugby. It is a great way to stay involved in Rugby after playing and give something back to the sport. Officiating also helps with your own personal and professional development, and it helps broaden your Rugby knowledge. It keeps you both physically and mentally fit and is incredibly rewarding. 

Rugby Officials come from all backgrounds, from ex-National players to armchair enthusiasts who wanted to become more involved with the sport.

Anyone can become a Rugby referee with the right attitude. Saskatchewan Rugby is here to support that process from start to finish. 

Become a Referee

Are you ready to become a Referee and inspire the next generation of Rugby stars? Follow the steps below:

Register for a World Rugby Passport and complete these three online certificates:

World Rugby Laws

World Rugby – Rugby Ready

World Rugby Concussion Management for the General Public

After each course you will be able to download, save and print your certificate in order to give it to your course facilitator.

Make sure you take your time when completing the online modules so you can absorb as much information as possible. Make note of any questions you want to ask your facilitator.

Can’t find a course in your area? Contact our Rugby Development Officer, Andrew Shaw at rdo@saskrugby.com

 

After completing all the relevant courses, it is now time to put those referee skills to use! To be able to referee, you must first register here.

You can register as a Match Official under Sask Rugby Referee Society or with your Club.

After you have registered to become a Rugby referee, it is important to stay both mentally and physically sharp. 

We recommend training physically! A Rugby Referee can expect to run an average 5.5km during an 80-minute match. At tournaments, you could officiate multiple games and cover more ground. So being in good physical condition is a must.

Becoming a Rugby Referee has more scope than you might think! Your career as a referee has the potential to take you to Local, Regional, Provincial, National and even International tournaments. You choose the pathway and Sask Rugby is here to support you every step of the way. 

Talk to your peers and mentors within the Refereeing world and see where officiating has taken them. 

Always remember to renew your World Rugby Concussion Management and Rugby Ready courses every year. 

Check out our Referee Resources section for some great information, videos and more!

Coaches

Why We Coach

Coaching Rugby is one of the most rewarding roles in the sport. It takes passion and dedication. Here you can learn how to become an inspirational leader who is ready to give guidance both on and off the field. 

There are many benefits to becoming a qualified Rugby coach. It is a great way to stay involved in the sport after retiring. You have the chance to develop yourself both personally and professionally as well as keeping yourself fit and active. 

Coaching is also the perfect way to give back to the sport and inspire the next generation of players. 

Become A Coach

If you want to become a rugby coach in Saskatchewan, follow the steps below.

There are a couple of online modules you need to complete before taking your Level 1 or Level 2 Coaching Course.

Sign up for a FREE World Rugby Passport

Complete the Rugby Ready Online Module

Complete the Concussion Management Module

Complete the Laws of the Game exam

Complete the NCCP Making Ethical Decisions Online Exam

Important: At the end of each module, make sure you save your certificates as PDF Files. Then you can upload them to your Rugby Canada Training profile you created in Step 1.

Handy Hint: The World Rugby Coaching Website is packed full of useful information, resources, videos and more to help build your skills and knowledge. Make sure to Bookmark it!

Create a coaching profile with Rugby Canada here

To enroll in Rugby Canada development sessions/courses, you will be charged a one-time fee of $25.00. This fee contributes directly towards subsidising transportation costs for course facilitators and sustaining our community development model.

Important: registering to coach.rugbycanada.ca does not mean a coach is registered and insured under the Rugby Canada Membership and Insurance Policy. This is explained further in Step 4.

Now you are ready to choose your coaching course! Pick the course that is right for you from the following options.

  • Introductory & Mini Rugby Coaching (World Rugby Level 1)
  • Competitive Rugby Coaching (World Rugby Level 2)

You do not need to take Level 1 to enroll in a Level 2 course. 

You will make the actual selection on the training.rugbycanada.ca website. The rest of the process is completed on that site.

If you want to work as a Rugby coach in Saskatchewan, you must register and pay the appropriate Membership fee. 

Registering with Rugby Canada to complete a coaching course DOES NOT mean you are registered to work as one. Find out more about Registration

Once you are registered to work as a Rugby coach, you can look for coaching vacancies. 

It is important that all Rugby coaches stay up to date. 

Make sure you check out the Sask Rugby Coach Resources page for Resource Sharing Networks, Certification Maintenance Requirements, videos and more.

Saskatchewan 2020/2021 Gilbert Champions

8 Saskatchewan athletes, Gabrielle Senft (Regina, SK), Elle Douglas (Saskatoon, SK), Molly Watson (Avonlea, SK), Laney Aikens (Briercrest, SK), Brett Kannenberg (Lumsden, SK), Madisyn Pluhowy (Regina, SK), Matt Klimchuk (Regina, SK) and Owen Watson (Avonlea, SK), were named Gilbert Champions in the 2020 Gilbert Champions program. These players received a Gilbert training kit and the opportunity to promote and mentor the growth of rugby in their communities with Gilbert Canada. Senft and Douglas will also be working with and mentored by the incredible team of 2020 ELITE GILBERT CHAMPIONS: Kayla Moleschi, Josiah Morra, Britt Benn and Jake Thiel – ALL members of the Rugby Canada team, and passionate advocates for how rugby has provided incredible life experiences both on and off the pitch.

Gabrielle Senft started as a high school player in Saskatchewan and quickly gained a reputation in the sport for her athleticism, talent, and tenacity. Senft has now played both 15s and 7s across Canada in British Columbia and across the world in Australia and England, all while being a force to be reckoned with on the Canadian National Team. In her Gilbert Canada profile, Senft reflects on the value of community in rugby: “Most importantly the community that rugby holds is something that has really drawn me to continue playing rugby all over the world”. 

Elle Douglas started as a mini player in the Saskatoon Mini Rugby program and has since played for the Saskatoon Sirens, North Sask Wolverines, and Team Saskatchewan. You might recognize her from Sask Rugby’s 2016 #ChampionHer video. In her Gilbert Canada profile, Douglas recalls this experience as an inspiration for her rugby dreams: “A big role model for me would be Kayla Mack. I first met her when I was 11 years old and I was doing an interview for women’s rugby. I remember being super excited to meet somebody who had played for Canada and was from Saskatchewan. She gave me a signed Canada warmup jersey from her playing days. I was so starstruck! Kayla really inspired me to pursue my dreams!”. 

Molly Watson started as a mini rugby player with Regina Minor Rugby, and has been apart of the Macdowell Rugby Academy and has continued with these programs. In her Gilbert Canada profile Watson expresses her interest in the sport: “I like all the different skills you can do and learn! I like that it can be challenging and I can be competitive when I play”.

Laney Aikens is currently playing rugby for the national senior women’s 7s team and has helped coach at the Macdowell Rugby Academy in Saskatchewan. In her Gilbert Canada profile Aikens explains why she loves rugby: “I love the aggression that comes along with rugby. Ever since I was a small child I have always had so much grit and now that there is a sport where I can use my aggressiveness as an asset, it makes for more success”.

Brett Kannenberg is the head coach at Macdowell Rugby Academy in Saskatchewan. His Gilbert Canada profile explains that he enjoys the sport of rugby because “[e]veryone has a place… [t]he inclusiveness of the sport makes it possible to be invilved at all age levels, abilities, desired competition, not to mention it is global”.

Madisyn Pluhowy started playing on the provincial team in 2019 and is currently playing senior rugby with the Lady Condors in Regina. In her  Gilbert Canada profile Madisyn expresses her love for the sport and the community: “I love the community that surrounds rugby as a whole. After losing a great deal of weight one of my friends mentioned rugby and I’ve never looked back. Rugby has revealed true friends that have supported me in the continuation of my weight loss journey and overall in life. I’m forever thankful for being included and excepted in such a tight nit community that rugby brought to me”.

Matt Klimchuk started playing rugby in high school and has since played senior rugby and in the U.S.. In his Gilbert Canada profile Klimchuk shows his admiration for the sport: “I love not only the immense culture behind the sport, but also the dynamics of the game. To me, a rugby player is not only a prime example of a incredible athlete, but also a person of strong character and work ethic. To me rugby Is the ultimate sport”.

Owen Watson has played both high school and provincial rugby, with a bright future ahead of him. In his Gilbert Canada profile Watson shared why he loves rugby: “I love the fact that Rugby has provided me with opportunities to travel to Florida to play in the Tropical 7s last April and play in the LA 7s tournament this past March. I love how much fun I have playing and learning new skills and meeting new people. I love the fact that I am not a very big kid but there is a position for me to play in a sport that I love!”.

emPowering the Prairies Club Development Standards

emPowering the Prairies Club Development Standards

The emPowering the Prairies Club Development Standards is a benchmarking and evaluation tool for rugby organizations that is intended to help such organizations measure themselves against best practice and create action plans for the future. The Club Development Standards is a sister program to the Club Development Series and is a joint partnership between Rugby Alberta, Saskatchewan Rugby, and Rugby Manitoba.

The Club Development Standards consists of an easy-to-complete self-evaluation that organization administrators can complete in under an hour. The self-evaluation helps organizations answer the question “are we a well-run organization?” It is intended for rugby organizations of all sizes and athlete demographics – having a lot of members, winning games, or having teams in all playing divisions does not necessarily equal a well-run organization. The Standards will help you understand whether the underlying structures of your organization are healthy and how they can improve.

For more information on any aspect of the emPowering the Prairies program and the Club Development Standards, please contact rdo@saskrugby.com.

How The Standards Work

Here’s what you need to know before taking the self-evaluation:

  • Organizations will be evaluated on questions in the categories listed to the right. There are between 5-7 questions per category. Organizations will only be evaluated on the playing divisions that they have or aspire to have.
  • Questions have a range of answer options that represent the spectrum from an ad-hoc approach (0 or 1) to best practice (4). Individuals completing the self-evaluation should select the answer option that best represents the current situation of their organization from the drop-down menu below the question graphic.
  • Respondents should make sure to review the questions and answer options in the section below before starting the self-evaluation to help make the self-evaluation as painless as possible. The self-evaluation should take less than an hour to complete.
  • It is recommended that organizations complete the self-evaluation as a Board/Executive. In addition to having everyone’s knowledge, doing this exercise as a group will help everyone get on the same page for future planning.
  • Some important information that organizations may wish to have handy when filling out the self-evaluation are:
    • knowledge of the organization’s governing documents, policies, and procedures;
    • the organization’s financial information over the past three years (i.e. a budget);
    • thorough knowledge of the club’s membership over the past three years (overall numbers, retention rates, past junior/minor participation, etc.);
    • the registration and certification statuses of coaches.
  • Once the self-evaluation is completed respondents will receive a copy of their answers and an official scorecard showing their scores across the different categories. Provincial union staff can and will help organizations interpret scores, access resources, and create action plans.

   Evaluation Categories:

  1. Organization Profile, Governance, & Administration
  2. Strategic Planning
  3. Financial Health
  4. Policy & Risk Management
  5. Club Assets, Equipment, & Commercial Activity
  6. Volunteer Management & Member Engagement
  7. Club Staff – Coaches & Medical Staff
  8. Playing Divisions

The Questions

As noted above, each category of the Club Development Standards self-evaluation has 5-7 questions contained within. The questions are a mix of things that administrators may be able to answer off the top of their head and things that may require research into organization documents.

Individuals and Boards/Executives who are preparing to fill out the self-evaluation can review all of the questions on the self-evaluation and the answer options by clicking through the gallery to the right. Use the arrows to click through all of the questions.

Please remember that organizations will only be evaluated on the playing divisions that they have or aspire to have so respondents will not see all 65 questions unless they have senior men’s, senior women’s, junior, and minor playing divisions administrated under a single club or organization.

Testimonials

Dennis Ng – Treasurer, Winnipeg Wasps

I thought it was an extremely useful exercise, it’s not always easy to identify what needs to be improved from an organizational standpoint when most of our focus has to do with keeping the teams running. In addition, seeing we were at a 1 in some categories, for example, and seeing what it would take to get to a 3 or 4 was also useful because it showed us some possibilities for what could be implemented or what we could achieve with a bit of work.

Access Club Development Resources

Looking for resources on how to improve your club or organization? The Club Development Series is a sister program to the Club Development Standards that focuses on providing instruction, education, and resources for club administrators. Access presentations from expert speakers, training and education opportunities, and the shared resource folder by clicking the button below.

Rugby Golf

Rugby Golf

Sask Rugby has mapped out courses in communities across the province using the “natural” features of public parks and rugby clubs. All individuals need to participate is a rugby ball! Submit your scores using the button below to be recognized on this page for a course record or hole-in-one.

Welcome to the newest form of rugby!

Rugby golf is a rugby variation that is meant to develop the kicking and passing skills of participants, in addition to being a fun way to enjoy the great outdoors. Players advance their ball towards the “hole” by kicking or passing it using recognized rugby techniques (e.g. grubber kick, spiral pass, etc.).

Continue reading for more information about rugby golf and to find courses in your area!

About Rugby Golf

Rugby golf has a simple set of rules to make the game fair, enjoyable, and challenging. See the rules below:

  1. Players should “tee off” on each hole using a drop-kick (the ball must hit the ground before it is struck by the player). On subsequent attempts, players may use any regular rugby kicking or throwing action to advance the ball.
  2. For the second and subsequent strokes on each hole, players should play from the spot where the previous stroke came to rest. Players may move to gain a better angle or shorter distance as long as they can keep one foot on the ground on the spot where the previous stroke came to rest.
  3. Courses will be laid out featuring hazards and out of bounds. Check out the guidebook for the course you are playing to know where these are. Players should do the following when they encounter a hazard or out of bounds:
    1. Hazard: If your ball hits or lands in a hazard area, the player should add a one stroke penalty to their score for the hole. If the ball comes to rest in the hazard area, the next action should be taken from the point where the ball entered the hazard.
    2. Out Of Bounds: If your ball goes into an out of bounds area, the player should add a one stroke penalty to their score for the hole and play the next action from where the throw/kick that went out of bounds was taken. If your ball goes into an out of bounds area, it may not be immediately recoverable. Check the guidebook for the course for information about retrieving your ball (if it can’t be immediately recovered).

The safety and enjoyment of rugby golf participants is important to us. Please keep the following in mind when playing rugby golf in a public place:

  1. When playing in a public place, be mindful of the other users of the space. You may need to slightly modify your activities, play at a faster/slower pace, or avoid playing a course/hole entirely to avoid hitting other park users if you are playing at a particularly busy time. Courses have been laid out to try to avoid conflicts with other users but participants should always use their discretion to avoid harm.
  2. Course etiquette is important. Be mindful of any course or park rules posted on site. Be sure to observe proper golf etiquette and let faster players and groups play through. A good overview of course etiquette can be found HERE. This applies to all courses, not only those that double as disc golf courses.
  3. Choose appropriate shots for the circumstances. Some actions pose a risk to player safety – e.g. kicking the ball at a disc golf basket at short range or kicking/throwing towards unsuspecting players – and we recommend using discretion to avoid these situations.
  4. Do not perform unsafe actions to retrieve your ball. This could include, but is not limited to, wading into a pond, climbing a tree, or entering private property. Be mindful of the course/hole layout and play appropriate shots to avoid these situations in the first place.
  5. If the course borders on private property or a parking lot/roadway, be mindful of avoiding damage to private property (e.g. hitting a parked car). Choose which shots you play and when you play them accordingly.
Participants should also be mindful of the current COVID-19 pandemic and the public health restrictions in place. Keep yourself safe by following these recommendations:
  1. Play by yourself and/or only with members of your immediate household.
  2. Bring your own equipment (ball).
  3. Abide by any and all public gathering restrictions in your area.
  4. Be aware of and abide by any municipal rules around the use of public parks, including possible park closures.
  5. Make every reasonable effort to remain 3m away from any other park users during your round.

Get A Rugby Ball

The only piece of equipment required for Rugby Golf is a rugby ball! If you don’t already have a rugby ball, you can purchase rugby balls via the Sask Rugby online store. Different sizes (suitable for different age groups) and styles are available for purchase. Stock and pricing will vary throughout the year as we order new products and host sales.

Find A Course

Find a course in your area from the list below. Click on your desired course to see course info, course records, and to download the course guidebook.

Course distances included below are an estimate and may include the distance between holes.

If you don’t see a course in your area and have an idea for a course location, contact rdo@saskrugby.com.

Course Length: 1020m
Course Difficulty: Easy
Course Record (20+): N/A
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Rugby Golf is the latest sports “facility” to be added to the athletic complex at Prime Minister’s Park. Starting near the Art Hauser Centre and finishing alongside Prince Albert RFC’s home field (Max Clunie Field) this course is a relatively easy challenge for players of all skill levels. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 2190m
Course Difficulty: Hard
Course Record (20+): 47 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

At over 2km, A.E. Wilson Park is the longest rugby golf course in Regina and a classic “drive and putt” layout. However, that doesn’t mean that this course isn’t without its share of challenging hole locations – don’t let your guard down and think that power is the only thing you need to focus on. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 858m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 38 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

The Douglas Park – Front 9 course is characterized by the variety of shotmaking required to navigate the course successfully. Most holes will let you bomb away from the tee but will challenge you to navigate trees and other obstacles to get close to the basket. A good grubber kick will lead to a good score. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The Douglas Park – Front 9 Course is mapped over the Douglas Park Disc Golf Course. The Disc Golf Course features 18 baskets numbered 1 through 18. The Douglas Park – Front 9 Rugby Golf Course is mapped over holes 1-9 of the Disc Golf Course.

Sask Rugby encourages players who enjoy the Douglas Park – Front 9 Course to support the Regina Disc Golf Association (who maintains the course) by purchasing a RDGA membership HERE.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 706m
Course Difficulty: Easy
Course Record (20+): 33 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

The Douglas Park – Back 9 course is a more tactical challenge than its Front 9 counterpart. Achieving the perfect distance (not too much and not too little) will be the single biggest factor for success as you navigate unpassable obstacles and tricky slopes. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The Douglas Park – Back 9 Course is mapped over the Douglas Park Disc Golf Course. The Disc Golf Course features 18 baskets numbered 1 through 18. The Douglas Park – Back 9 Rugby Golf Course is mapped over holes 10-18 of the Disc Golf Course.

Sask Rugby encourages players who enjoy the Douglas Park – Back 9 Course to support the Regina Disc Golf Association (who maintains the course) by purchasing a RDGA membership HERE.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 1470m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 40 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Located in the southeast of Regina, this course navigates the length of Green Meadow Park. Players will be challenged to stay on the straight-and-narrow to avoid the ponds, paths, and fences. This is a fairly flat course, but players should be extremely considerate of their fellow park users, particularly near the play park near hole #9. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 1540m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 40 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Warm up on the flats before climbing and descending the heights of Mount Pleasant. All of the uphill hiking will be worth it for the fantastic view of the city of Regina. This long, mostly flat course allows you to reach for the big kicks in your arsenal without much fear of hazards, but make sure to account for the slopes on holes 7-9! Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 920m
Course Difficulty: Easy
Course Record (20+): 30 – Cable Guy – April 10, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Located at the Regina Rugby Clubhouse, this is a relatively easy course for all ages with plenty of open space, few hazards, and flat terrain. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 808m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 42 – Cable Guy – April 1, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Don’t let the relatively short length of this course fool you, the Diefenbaker Park Blue Course will challenge you with some tricky hole locations that will punish wayward bounces of the ball. This course is a real test of your control and accuracy! Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The Diefenbaker Park Blue Course is mapped over 9 of the 18 holes at the Diefenbaker Park Disc Golf Course. However, in order to create two coherent 9-hole courses, the rugby golf hole numbers do not always correspond to the disc golf hole numbers. Use the chart below to help you navigate the course.

 

You can see more information about the Diefenbaker Park Disc Golf Course on the UDisc Website/App.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 982m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 38 – Cable Guy – April 1, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

The Diefenbaker Park Red Course features a mix of long and short holes with baskets guarded by natural obstacles. The ability to make long, accurate kicks with forward bounce will be the key determinant of success on this course. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The Diefenbaker Park Red Course is mapped over 9 of the 18 holes at the Diefenbaker Park Disc Golf Course. However, in order to create two coherent 9-hole courses, the rugby golf hole numbers do not always correspond to the disc golf hole numbers. Use the chart below to help you navigate the course.

 

 

 

You can see more information about the Diefenbaker Park Disc Golf Course on the UDisc Website/App.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 1160m
Course Difficulty: Hard
Course Record (20+): 42 – Paul D – March 20, 2021
Course Record (13-19): 45 – Connor D & Elle D (tie) – March 20, 2021 & March 20, 2021
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Check two items off your summer to-do list with this course located at Saskatoon’s Forestry Farm Park & Zoo. This course features a mix of short and long holes with some wide open spaces and challenging obstacles that will challenge your range of kicking and passing techniques. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 1650m
Course Difficulty: Medium
Course Record (20+): 37 – Cable Guy – April 5, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Lean back and let it rip on the wide-open expanses of Henry Kelsey Park. The first half of this course encourages players to use their long-distance kicking skills in a flat area that can feature some strong winds. The second half features some tricky obstacles that will challenge your touch and approach, particularly on holes where the objective borders on the out of bounds area. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 680m
Course Difficulty: Easy
Course Record (20+): 30 – Cable Guy – March 19, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Located at the Saskatoon Rugby Clubhouse, this is a relatively easy course for all ages with plenty of open space, few hazards, and flat terrain. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Course Length: 845m
Course Difficulty: Hard
Course Record (20+): 42 – Cable Guy – April 7, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Subtle slopes and inconveniently located trees will test your patience and tactical acumen on the William A. Reid Park Front 9 Course. Players will need to pick the right shot for the circumstances lest the short-ish 845m of this course will play more like 1200m! Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The William A. Reid Front 9 Course is mapped over the William A. Reid Park Disc Golf Course. The Disc Golf Course features two sets of tees (numbered 1-18) for 9 baskets. The William A. Reid Park Front 9 Rugby Golf Course is mapped over holes 1-9 of the Disc Golf Course.

You can see more information about the William A. Reid Park Disc Golf Course on the UDisc Website/App.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

 

Course Length: 824m
Course Difficulty: Hard
Course Record (20+): 37 – Cable Guy – April 7, 2021
Course Record (13-19): N/A
Course Record (12 & Under): N/A

Your patience and tactical acumen will be tested as you play your way around pesky trees and try to hold your ball on slippery slopes on the William A. Reid Park Back 9 Course. Wayward shots will be punished with harder-than-expected recovery shots so sometimes straight is better than far. Click the image to the right to access the Course Guidebook!

The William A. Reid Back 9 Course is mapped over the William A. Reid Park Disc Golf Course. The Disc Golf Course features two sets of tees (numbered 1-18) for 9 baskets. The William A. Reid Park Back 9 Rugby Golf Course is mapped over holes 10-18 of the Disc Golf Course.

You can see more information about the William A. Reid Park Disc Golf Course on the UDisc Website/App.

Holes-In-One On This Course:
None

Coast to Coast Rugby Coaching Conference

Sask Rugby is proud to partner with our other provincial unions to provide the Coast to Coast Connecting the Country: Rugby Conference running virtually March 27th to 29th, 2021. The Coast to Coast Coaching Conference will target the existing rugby coach community in Canada, including those coaching at clubs, schools, universities, and high performance environments. The full speaker list and poster and available below.

The conference will take participants through a ‘week in rugby’, where they will interact with experienced community and professional coaches, academics, and those with lived experience in sport. It will serve as an opportunity for participants to listen to and interact with local and international experts at the heart of developing sport. Conference registration is $35, with each registration fee including a $5 donation to the Monty Heald Women’s National Fund

Anyone who registered as a rugby coach in Saskatchewan in 2019 or 2020 is eligible to have their registration fees covered by Sask Rugby. Contact memberservices@saskrugby.com for details on this program.

Register here!

2020 Sask Rugby Raffle Winner

Thank you to everyone who supported Sask Rugby’s 3rd annual youth rugby fundraiser! In total there were 462 tickets sold and $1,110.00 raised, making this our largest 50/50 raffle to date. 

Sask Rugby would like to congratulate Jared Goosen, winner of half of the pot for a prize of $555.

Thank you again to everyone who bought tickets and shared the raffle, keep your eyes out for our 2021 raffle announcement coming soon!

Flag Rugby

flag rugby

what is flag Rugby?

Flag rugby is a non-contact game where players each wear a belt with two velcro flags attached.  Attacking players attempt to dodge and evade defenders while passing to their team mates.  Defending players prevent the opposition from scoring by pulling a tag off the player carrying the ball.  The game is a great introduction to many of the core elements of rugby and is ideal for young children.

WHO CAN PLAY?

Anyone! No experience necessary, flag rugby is perfect for new players learning the game, experienced players developing fitness and skills, and for introducing gameplay to young players

    • For junior and senior players: join a co-ed, flag rugby league. 
    • For minor players: join a mini rugby program in your community.

For questions about flag rugby and Sask Rugby’s flag rugby leagues, email rdo@saskrugby.com. 

Roster submission for the Regina and Saskatoon flag rugby leagues is now open! Submit your team roster between now and January 14th for the first round of games. Roster changes (subject to conditions – see link below) can be made ahead of each round.